Limiting insync bandwidth using Trickle


#1

I need to limit the upload bandwidth used by Insync and turned to Trickle as recommended by someone in this thread: Bandwith limiting when uploading

I used the exact command suggested there - trickle -s -u 200 insync start - and a few variations but they don’t seem to limiting Insync’s bandwidth use in any way. Can anyone offer any advice?

From looking around the web, I learned that Trickle itself is pretty old and that it doesn’t work on “suid/sgid binaries”. Could that mean it doesn’t work on the latest Insync?


Port INSYNC uses on Linux
#2

Hello @insyncerr,

As we do not have yet the bandwith control feature, we haven’t tested trickle if this works with the latest Insync version.

What is the OS you are running for me to have our engineer test it out if this is working.

Thank you.


#3

That was me that recommended that application. If you could run the command from the terminal, it should give you an error which might help figure out why it isn’t working.

The application hasn’t been updated in a decade but still works. I’ve been using it for a couple of years and it works in the latest version of Ubuntu and Kubuntu (15.04).

If it is installed correctly, if you just type trickle, you should see the following output.

If that is working, then put in the entire string. If its working, you should just see a new row with no error and the application should appear in your system tray.

Assuming that works, use the same command and set it as a startup application. Be sure to disable the entry that is added when you install the application.

Note to the dev team. Maybe looking at their source could inspire an integration at least in the nix versions. :wink: Its a BSD license so maybe not.


#4

@lpugoy Please confirm this use-case. Thank you.


#5

It is on our pipeline but that being said bandwidth control is not a priority right now, apologies for the inconvenience.


#6

A couple of years later and this is the first hit when I started trialling the software and it flooded my connection. One apt-get and a couple of edits later and all is good. I’m now setting some Cron jobs to kick it in and out with different settings by time of day instead of the startup routine.